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Posts Tagged ‘Carol Highsmith’

Skeletons!

Posted by havealittletalk on October 22, 2013

Getting ready for Halloween? Here’s some images from the Library of Congress.

The first is by Dr. Alice S. Kandell, who donated her Collection of Sikkim Photographs to the Library of Congress and placed them in the public domain.

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Deity and skeleton masks, Gangtok, Sikkim, by Alice Kandell. LC-KAN05- 0094.

 

Frances Benjamin Johnston shot this picture in the mid-1930s of an Indian burial ground near what was believed to be the site of the Fountain of Youth in St. Augustine, Florida.

LC-DIG-csas-00429

 
Here’s a view of a corridor in the Cappuccino Catacombs, Rome, Italy, in August 1987.

Corridor in the Cappuccino Catacombs, Rome, Italy

LC-USZ62-54103

Why not some animal skeletons, starting with this interpretation of a dinosaur skeleton leashed to a man-like skelton somewhere near Murdo, South Dakota, photographed by Carol Highsmith in 2009?

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LC-DIG-highsm-04579

 

This is just one in a series of pictures of horse skeletons in motion.

Skeleton of horse. Running. Off the ground

LC-USZC4-13861

Eadweard Muybridge created The attitudes of animals in motion : a series of photographs illustrating the consecutive positions assumed by animals in performing various movements in Palo Alto, California, in 1878 and 1879; the album was published in 1881.

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The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963

Posted by havealittletalk on July 4, 2013

Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, Birmingham, Alabama

Carol Highsmith’s photo of the Wales window at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church.
Credit: The George F. Landegger Collection of Alabama Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. [LC-DIG-highsm-05063]

I have a new blog: Long Time Coming at  http://longtimecoming1963.wordpress.com/.

I’ve been neglecting my other blogs lately because I have been helping a friend by putting his mother’s book up as a blog. This is the fiftieth anniversary of the turning point in the Civil Rights Era in the US, and his mother, Elizabeth H. Cobbs, risked her life in 1977 to testify against her uncle by marriage, Robert Chambliss, who largely through her testimony was the first bomber of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church to be convicted. She cooperated fully with the FBI in 1963, and had this become known, the Ku Klux Klan would have killed her, but her efforts then were futile because FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover decided to shelve the case indefinitely.

If you are unfamiliar with this event, briefly, on September 15, 1963, a bomb exploded in the basement of a black Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four young girls, and seriously injuring a fifth. You may have heard of Spike Lee’s film, 4 Little Girls

This is what I wrote on the home page of Long Time Coming

This website presents in full the original text of Long Time Coming: An Insider’s Story of the Birmingham Church Bombing That Rocked The World written by Elizabeth H. Cobbs/Petric J. Smith and published by Crane Hill Publishers in 1994.

The author died in 1998.

Crane Hill Publishers is no longer operating, and Long Time Coming is out-of-print. The Estate of Petric J. Smith is making this digital edition available so that the story of the long journey to the conviction of Robert Chambliss for the death of Denise McNair in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, is accessible to a wider audience.  . . .

This digital edition takes advantage of its formatting by adding hyperlinks to the text. New pictures, which unless otherwise noted are in the public domain and available at the Library of Congress’s website, have also been included.

As I worked on the blog, I added public domain pictures to illustrate the story.

And as always with images of contemporary America, my best source was the The George F. Landegger Collection of Alabama Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Carol Highsmith has placed over 100,000 images in the public domain through her archive at the Library of Congress. She is now going state by state, capturing even more images of contemporary America.

For my purposes, I was fortunate that the first state she was able to cover was Alabama. You can read about that here.

I used a number of her photographs of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, the Civil Rights Institute, and Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham in Long Time Coming. Here are just a few examples: 

 

Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, Birmingham, Alabama

Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, Birmingham, Alabama. The George F. Landegger Collection of Alabama Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-DIG-highsm-05091

 

Sculpture dedicated to the Foot Soldiers of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement. Kelly Ingram Park, Birmingham, Alabama

Sculpture dedicated to the Foot Soldiers of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement. Kelly Ingram Park, Birmingham, Alabama. The George F. Landegger Collection of Alabama Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. LC-DIG-highsm-05100


Ku Klux Klan exhibit, Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, Birmingham, Alabama. Credit: The George F. Landegger Collection of Alabama Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division [LC-DIG-highsm-05074]

 

For historical photos, the Library of Congress was also my best source. Examples:

2.  GENERAL PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST (FRONT) AND NORTHEAST SIDE FROM KELLY-INGRAM PARK - Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, 1530 Sixth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

GENERAL PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST (FRONT) AND NORTHEAST SIDE FROM KELLY-INGRAM PARK – Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, 1530 Sixth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL. Library of Congress, HABS ALA,37-BIRM,33–2.

Ku Klux Klan, between 1921 and 1922. Library of Congress. LC-DIG-npcc-30454

[Group of African Americans viewing the

Bomb-damaged home of Arthur Shores, NAACP attorney, Birmingham, Alabama. Photo by Marion Trikoskco, 1963 Sept. 5. LC-DIG-ppmsca-03194

[Federalized National Guard troops on the campus of the University of Alabama, June 11, 1963 when African Americans Vivian Malone and James Hood registered for classes]

Federalized National Guard troops on the campus of the University of Alabama, June 11, 1963 when African Americans Vivian Malone and James Hood registered for classes. Photo by Warren Leffler. LC-DIG-ds-01108

Mugshots are in the public domain:

Mugshot of Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bomber Robert Chambliss, arrested September 26, 1977 for murder.

Frankly, were it not for Carol Highsmith’s incredible generosity in placing her work in the public domain, and the U.S. News & World Report magazine photograph collection at the Library of Congress [Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on work taken by staff photographers. Other material may be restricted by copyright. For more inforamtion, see U.S. News ... (http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/078_usnw.html)], photographs for which permission need not be asked or licensing fees paid were hard to find.

—–

Note: On the Long Time Coming blog, you will also see photos with the note: Property of the Birmingham Public Library.  These are not in the public domain. I included these in that blog, but not in this one, because they also appear in the print version of Long Time Coming, meaning Elizabeth Cobbs/Petric J. Smith or Crane Hill Publishers secured permission for their use in 1994, and I am waiting to hear if that permission extends to digital editions. Meanwhile, I have included them there under Fair Use provisions, since the blog is not-for-profit but for educational purposes.

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Happy New Year!

Posted by havealittletalk on December 31, 2011

 

LC-DIG-highsm-11570

Mummer’s Parade on New Year’s Day, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. By Carol Highsmith, 1/1/2011.

Last New Year’s Day, January 1, 2011, Carol Highsmith photographed the Mummers’ parade in Philadelphia, PA. This is just one of her gloriously colorful photos from that event in the Carol Highsmith Archive of the Library of Congress’s Prints & Photographs Online Catalog. Just follow the link above to her archive and enter “new year.”

LC-DIG-ggbain-03046

Same parade, 102 years before the one pictured above.

LC-USZC4-10654

LC-DIG-ppmsca-27906

LC-USZ62-58961. 1908

LC-DIG-ggbain-15029. ca. 1910 and ca. 1915

LC-DIG-ppmsca-27593

By Udo Keppler. LoC Summary: Illustration shows waiters Joseph G. Cannon and James S. Sherman turning away a man labeled “Average Citizen” and a woman at the “Hotel Prosperity” dining room because all the tables have been reserved; there are signs on the tables that read “Reserved for Wool Interests, Reserved for Coal Trust, Reserved for Steel Trust, Reserved for Senator Aldrich and Party, Reserved for Cold Storage Interests, Reserved for Sugar Trust, Reserved for Ice Trust, [and] Reserved for Franchise Grabbers”. Illus. in: Puck, v. 66, no. 1713 (1909 December 29)

 

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All Saints Day, All Souls Day, Day of the Dead

Posted by havealittletalk on October 31, 2011

November 1 and 2, All Saints Day and All Souls Day, or in Mexico and other parts of the world, the Day of the Dead or Día de los Muertos, are the inspiration for this post featuring images from the Library of Congress’s Prints & Photographs Online Catalog.

Gran bola de garbanceras que, por ser muy pretensiosas, se volverán calaveras podridas y apestosas. LC-DIG-ppmsc-04553

Calavera del drenaje. El mérito día de finados todos los que se restiraron por causa del drenaje. LC-DIG-ppmsc-04464

LC-DIG-ppmsc-04574

A Heap of bones in the cemetery [Necropolis Cristobal Colon], Havana. LC-D4-21573

Decorated gravemarker on All Saints’ Day, New Roads, Louisiana. Note the beaded ornament, which is made of wire and beads. Photo by Lee Russell, 1938. LC-USF33-011892-M4

Statue on grave in Cities of the Dead, New Orleans, Louisiana. Photo by Carol Highsmith.  LC-DIG-highsm-04806

Mexico, mummies in basement of church, Mexico City, between 1908 and 1919.  LC-DIG-npcc-19740

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Football!

Posted by havealittletalk on September 18, 2011

Fall football images from the Library of Congress, leading off with two by Carol Highsmith:

Head coach Gene Chizik leads the Auburn Tigers football team onto the football stadium for the 2010 Auburn-South Carolina game, Auburn, Alabama. LC-DIG-highsm-11541

And if I have a shot of Auburn University, I need one of the University of Alabama, as well:

University of Alabama football game, Tuscaloosa, Alabama. LC-DIG-highsm-06883

Football and cars seem to have always gone together. This picture was taken in 1939 by Marion Post Wolcott:

Cars parked along the highways on day of Duke-Carolina football game, near Duke University Stadium. LC-USF34-052649-D

Who would think this a picture taken in the stands at a football game?

Ethel Roosevelt, in stands at football game. LC-DIG-ggbain-03024

I can’t decide if this looks like fun or just stupid:

Washington Redskins start training. Washington, D.C. Aug. 28. He-man exercise took the place of calisthenics today as the Redskins, Washington's entry in National Professional Football League, started training. The boys "flying thru the air" are, left to right: Millner (Notre Dame), Rentner (Northwestern) and Peterson (West Virginia) Wesleyan) 8/28/37. LC-DIG-hec-23282

Nothing much has changed since Frank A. Nankivell drew this illustration for the cover of the November 14, 1906 Puck magazine of  “the sun wearing a football helmet, beaming rays onto a football shaped planet that shows a stadium with fans in the grandstands and a football game in progress; also shows, in the background, an outline of a young woman’s head.”

The college world. LC-DIG-ppmsca-26112

Posted in Carol Highsmith, Library of Congress, Places | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

From the Highsmith Archive: Cuba, Part 2

Posted by havealittletalk on February 17, 2011

Of the 416 photographs of Cuba in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive at the Library of Congress, a number are images of art in public places, from amateur murals to sculpture to funerary statues. Here are some examples.

Credit line for each photograph should read: The Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Mural showing the Cuban flag and Che Guevara. LC--DIG-highsm-06012

Dragones Street, in the Chinatown section of Havana, Cuba. LC-DIG-highsm-06070

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Historical, Library of Congress, Places | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

From the Carol M. Highsmith Archive: Havana, Cuba

Posted by havealittletalk on January 30, 2011

Early in 2010, before arriving in Alabama to document life in that state in the early 21st century, photographer Carol Highsmith added to her archive at the Library of Congress 416 photographs of contemporary Havana, Cuba. Her subjects include 16th century Morro Castle and Castillo de la Real Fuerza,  and  interiors and exterior views of well-preserved, palatial buildings, e.g. the nation’s capitol (“El Capitolio”), alongside examples of deteriorating buildings bearing remanants of their former architectural grandeur. In a second post I’ll show you examples of her photos of public art in Havana.

Credit line for each photograph should read:

The Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Havana, Cuba. LC-DIG-highsm-06188

Castillo de la Real Fuerza, Havana, Cuba. After Havana was destroyed in 1555 by the French pirate Jacques de Sores, the Spanish Crown built a more solid fortress to replace the original, ineffectual tower known as La Fuezza Vieja. In 1558 they began work on Castillo de la Real Fuerza. It was completed in 1577. There is a moat that surrounds the fortress and a drawbridge leading the to main building. It was restored in 1963 and is a museum. LC-DIG-highsm-06057

Read the rest of this entry »

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One Down, 49 To Go: Carol Highsmith’s Images of Alabama Now Online at the Library of Congress

Posted by havealittletalk on January 22, 2011

I first wrote about Carol Highsmith two years ago when I asked, Is Carol M. Highsmith the Most Generous Artist of Our Time? after coming across her archive at the  Library of Congress’s Prints and Photographs Online Catalog and learning that eventually she will have provided the public an estimated 100,000 images for their personal, educational, or commercial use — all for the price of a credit line.

Then last year I told you Carol Highsmith was in Alabama, working on a project for the Library of Congress, the 21st Century America Collection. Her goal is to document in digital images life in each state so that future generations will have an idea of what America was like in the first decades of this century. She was able to get going on this project because of the generosity of businessman and philanthropist George F. Landegger, who funded the Alabama collection.

Carol spent much of 2010 traveling over 20,000 miles up, down, across, and around the state of Alabama, and now the George F. Landegger Alabama Library of Congress Collection is completed and up for your viewing at the Library of Congress.

Now Carol is hard at work with the 21st Century America Foundation, Inc., a “priority initiative” of the Library of Congress, looking for funding to get to work on her next state. Which one remains to be seen, but I’ll let you know as soon as I can. Meanwhile, time for the pictures.

Credit lines for each of these public domain images should read: The George F. Landegger Collection of Alabama Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

The Alabama Theatre was built in 1927 by Paramount Studios in Birmingham, Alabama as a showcase for Paramount films.
Dauphin Island, Alabama
Read the rest of this entry »

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