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Walter McClintock Lantern Slides of Northern Plains Nations in the Yale Collection of Western Americana

Posted by Laurie Frost on August 9, 2010

 

Tipis on prairie; Snow Tipi in foreground.
Credit: Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library [1048612]

 Today’s post introduces a new source for public domain images, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University. ALERT: As with the images in the Library of Congress, some of the Beinecke’s are public domain, and some are not. It is up to you to look at the catalog information to see what the copyright status is. Please also visit the Permissions and Copyright page at the Beinecke. And remember always to credit your source in the manner the source prescribes.

We’ll look at some of its other digital collections in future posts.

Now then, I was thinking about trying to get a reservation at one of the wigwam motels still remaining on Route 66 in Arizona, and that somehow led me here. Of  course, tipis are out of place in the Southwest. It was the nomadic Great Plains nations, like the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Kiowa, and Blackfoot who had tipis. It’s amusing to see the billboards and storefronts of souvenir shacks in New Mexico and Arizona adorned with tipis: they are announcing to anyone who paid a bit of attention to Indian history that it is  likely their “Indian” wares were made by the indigenous peoples of China.

These images are hand-colored  lantern slides by Walter McClintock.  All of these images should be cited as belonging to the Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. I’ve included their image ID numbers to make it easier for you to get more information or see larger (and yeah, I know, I’ve been inconsistent with formatting, but it’s been a rough week). Just enter the number in the search box and choose Image ID in the drop-down menu.

 Here’s a brief account  of Walter McClintock’s work from the Beinecke Library:

Pittsburgh native Walter McClintock graduated from Yale in 1891. In 1896 he traveled west as a photographer for a federal commission investigating national forests. McClintock became friends with the expedition’s Blackfoot Indian scout, William Jackson or Siksikakoan. When the commission completed its field work, Jackson introduced McClintock to the Blackfoot community of northwestern Montana. Over the next twenty years, supported by the Blackfoot elder Mad Wolf, McClintock made several thousand photographs of the Blackfoot, their homelands, their material culture, and their ceremonies.

Most titles were added by library cataloguers, and most images are undated, but are roughly from 1896-1916.

 

Tipis at night with shadows.

Credit: Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library [050362]

 

Indian man wearing horned headdress; riding white horse.

 Credit: Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library [1050341] 

Young Indian girl seated, holding puppy by small tipi.

Credit: Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library [1050315]

 Grass-dancer.

 Credit: Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library [1048940]

 

Dance regalia and war bonnets of the Northern Blackfoot of Alberta.

 Credit: Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library [1048915]

 

Tipi with pictographs.

Credit: Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library [1048614]

 

Platform grave suspended between two trees; skull visible.

Credit: Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library [1050500] . 

Siksika Indians. Montana.

Credit: Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library [1050407] 

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