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Posts Tagged ‘Arnold Genthe’

Dragons

Posted by havealittletalk on November 13, 2010

Here’s a variety of dragons, all culled from the Library of Congress’s vast storehouse.

This first is such an odd thing. This woodcut (1472) by Roberto Valturio is described as depicting a mobile tank-like fortress in the shape of a dragon. [Mobile tank-like fortress in the shape of a dragon]

LC-USZ62-110292

Next up, another woodcut,  is  based on Revelation of John: (12:3-12:7) Michael and his angels fighting a seven-headed dragon, and (13:1-13:2) Saint John seeing a similar seven-headed beast that looked like a leopard rising out of the sea.  It was published in Apocalypsis Sancti Johannis [Germany, ca. 1470].

[From the Revelation of John: (12:3-12:7) Michael and his angels fighting a seven-headed dragon, and (13:1-13:2) Saint John seeing a similar seven-headed beast that looked like a leopard rising out of the sea]

LC-USZ62-110334

St. Michael seems to be having to work at vanquishing his dragon, but his angelic comrade on the upper right appears to be enjoying the battle in this woodcut by Albrecht Dürer, ca. 1511.

[St. Michael fighting the dragon]

LC-DIG-ppmsca-06618

This British World War I poster from 1915 makes use of the legend of St. George and the Dragon:

Britain needs you at once

LC-USZC4-11248 

But intriguingly, so does this one, Unser Kaiser an sein Volk  by Edward Kaempster.  Under the heading “Our Emperor to his people” ” is a proclamation issued by Kaiser Wilhelm II on July 31, 1914, concerning the advent of war, the coming struggle, and the need to pray for God’s help for the soldiers. Poster was issued for the benefit of the Red Cross.”

Unser Kaiser an sein Volk

 LC-USZC4-11627

These Japanese men are not stabbing the dragon, they are holding him up with sticks for the dragon dance.

Tojin ja-odori no zu

Tojin ja-odori no zu [Chinese dragon dance]. Between 1850 and 1900. LC-USZC4-10363

Another Japanese woodcut, this one, Tobae mitate ryūgen sennin [Toba-e correspondence of a Chinese sage], by Toyohiro Utagawa is thought to be from between 1804 and 1818. It “shows a man smoking a cigarette in a long holder, and a dragon ascending in a plume of smoke coming from a box on the ground next to him; a child(?) gestures toward the dragon.” Tobae mitate ryūgen sennin

LC-DIG-jpd-00052

Fuji [mori]goe no ryū

Fuji [mori]goe no ryū [Dragon rising over Mount Fuji]. Between 1890 and 1920. LC-DIG-jpd-01939

 

Here’s a dragon spitting water, not fire, photographed by Arnold Genthe for Travel Views of  Japan and Korea (1908).

Travel views of Japan and Korea

LC-G397-T01-0214

 

This print “shows a woman playing a koto with a dragon curled around her.”

 Ryū ko niban

Ryū ko niban [Tiger and dragon] by Gogaku Yajima [between 1818 and 1830].  LC-DIG-jpd-00088 

Posted in Animals, Historical, Library of Congress, Places | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Presidential and Portrait Studio Cats

Posted by havealittletalk on October 1, 2010

There are those who are comfortable with cats, and those who aren’t — or maybe it is one thing to be in the company of a cat [human] you know, and altogether different to be with a strange cat [human]. 

The first four images are from the National Archives. The remainder are from the Library of Congress.

Photograph of Socks the Cat on President William J. Clinton's Shoulder, 03/25/1993 Socks the Cat on President William J. Clinton’s Shoulder, 03/25/1993. ARC Identifier 2131121

Photograph of Socks the Cat Visiting the U.S. Soldiers and Airmen's Home, 09/16/1993

 Socks the Cat Visiting the U.S. Soldiers and Airmen’s Home, 09/16/1993. ARC Identifier 3578323

No one would know from these pictures that Amy Carter didn’t often smile for the photographers who hounded her. And isn’t it nice to see an apple-faced Siamese instead of the bony, hyper-angular look breeders seem to think all must prefer these days? 

Amy Carter with her cat Misty Malarky Ying Yang, 08/15/1977. ARC Identifier 175914

 Amy Carter with her cat, Misty Malarky Ying Yang, 02/03/1978. ARC Identifier 177850

"Tige" the White House cat and pet of Mrs. Coolidge has been returned

“‘Tige, the White House cat and pet of Mrs. Coolidge, has been returned. Benj. Fink, guard at the Navy Dept. found Tige promenading around the Navy Bldg. and immediately returned him to the White House.  Tige’s disappearance was broadcasted by Wash. radio stations.” March 25, 1924. LC-USZ62-131880

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These next photographs are all by Arnold Genthe  (1869-1942). Born and raised in Germany, his first studio was in San Francisco where he worked from 1898 to 1911, when he moved to New York City. He photographed the rich and famous, but also is remembered for his books of images of Chinatown in San Francisco, New Orleans, and dance.

Now, here is Buzzer his studio cat. If he doesn’t look too pleased posing alone, he seems to barely tolerate the series of fine ladies who disturb his days.

 Buzzer the cat, portrait photograph

 Buzzer the cat, portrait photograph. LC-G432-0187

Warren, Gertrude, Miss, or Miss Jackman, with Buzzer the cat, portrait photograph

Campbell, Natalie, Miss, with Buzzer the cat, portrait photograph

Silvester child with Buzzer the cat, portrait photograph

Frost, Lucille, Miss, with Buzzer the cat, portrait photograph

Who does Buzzer like least? And what does he think of that fox head?

There are dozens more of these at the Library of Congress — different ladies, same disgruntled cat.

 

LC-G432-0185, LC-G432-0604-A,  LC-G432-0870, LC-DIG-agc-7a13489

Posted in Animals, Historical, Library of Congress, National Archives, People | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

New Orleans, Again

Posted by havealittletalk on August 30, 2009

More views of New Orleans from the Library of Congress. Credits below.

LC-G391-T-0825

The old Ursuline convent, interior and upper story,and Spanish moss. Photographed in the 1920s by Arnold Genthe.

7a09827r

 

 

 

 

 

 

LC-G391-T-1417

Canal St. 1901 or 023a00154r3a49161r

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8e08107r

Two by Walker Evans for the Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information: “Movie theatre on Saint Charles Street, Liberty Theater” and “Frame houses.”

8c52398r

 

Credits: All photographs are from the Library of Congress

Image identifier numbers [bracketed note added]:

LC-G391-T-0825 [ Window and stairway]

LC-G406-0059 [Ursuline convent]

LC-G391-T-1417 [Spanish moss]

LC-USZ6-148 [half stereo card]

LC-USZ62-49034 [horses right]

LC-USF342- 001285-A [theatre]

LC-USF342- 008060-E [houses]

Posted in Farm Security Administration, Historical, Library of Congress, Places, WPA | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

New Orleans

Posted by havealittletalk on August 28, 2009

7a02818r

“A vista through iron lace, New Orleans.” Arnold Genthe, photographer. Photographic negative made between 1920 and 1926

Four years ago tonight New Orleans and coastal Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama had just a few hours  left before Hurricane Katrina made landfall for the second time, having already killed six people and spawned tornadoes doing $1-2 billion property damage in South Florida.

My next few posts will give you a glimpse of some of the thousands of public domain images of  New Orleans in the Library of Congress’s Prints and Photographs online, many dating pre-1923. Several of these are from its collection of works by photographer Arnold Genthe (1869-1942).lc g3911 t 1059LC-G391-T01-0190 Credits are listed at the end of the post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Louis  Cemetery: Because New Orleans is below sea level, people aren’t buried in the ground but rather in above ground tombs or wall vaults. The cemeteries resemble cities of the dead with single family dwellings (tombs) and high rise apartment blocks (wall vaults). The wall vaults are sometimes called ovens. You may remember one of New Orleans’ cemeteries as a setting in Easy Rider.  

det 4a10800rSt. Louis Cathedral:  New Orleans is a cathedral town. In this 1903 image from the Detroit Publishing Company Photograph Collection, the St. Louis Cathedral is seen fronted by Jackson Square. A balcony’s iron railings provided Genthe a frame through which to shoot the cathedral, and in the next photo, he shows the cathedral from Chartres Street. Note the wrought iron balconies.LC-G391-T-0965LC-G406-T-0100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LC-G406-T-0082

 

Credits: All photographs are from the Library of Congress’s Arnold Genthe Collection, with the exception on that of Jackson Square [LC det 4a10800r ], which is from its Detroit Publishing Company Photograph Collection.

Image identifier numbers [bracketed note added]:
LC-G391-T-0258 [vista]
LC-G391-T01-0190 [tombs]
LC-G391-1059 [wall vaults]
det 4a10800r [Jackson Square]
LC G391-T-0965 [framed]
LC-G406-T-0100 [Chartres]
LC-G406-T-0082 [nun]

Posted in Historical, Library of Congress, People, Places | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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